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PATCO President Turns Down Controller Job - National Briefing | Southwest


PATCO President Turns Down Controller Job



By

Russ Niles

, Contributing Editor

Ron Taylor has been out of work in his chosen field for almost 26 years, but that doesn't mean he's going to take the first offer that comes along. Taylor, the president of the Professional Air Traffic Controllers Organization (PATCO) whose members were fired en masse by President Ronald Reagan in 1981 when they went ahead with strike action, says he's been offered a job as an air traffic controller by the FAA in his old facility at West Palm Beach, Fla., but he's not taking it. In a news release, Taylor said he's not about to work for the FAA's new starting wage, which was imposed as part of the enforced settlement of a labor contract with the National Air Traffic Controllers Association (NATCA) last year. He said he was offered about a third of what an experienced controller would make, and he's not about to accept the "inadequate, substandard and discriminatory salary that the Agency has offered to me." According to FAA spokeswoman Laura Brown, there are plenty of people anxious to take Taylor's spot.

July 11, 2007

5 Mourned After Florida Plane Crash

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Filed at 10:11 a.m. ET

SANFORD, Fla. (AP) -- Fuel poured down a staircase inside the burning home as off-duty firefighter Ryan Cooper tried to rescue a seriously burned father who was frantically searching for his younger child, the firefighter recalled Wednesday.

A small plane with a NASACAR pilot and the husband of a racing executive aboard had crashed into two homes, spilling fuel and setting both ablaze.

Cooper was kissing his wife goodbye in their nearby driveway Tuesday morning when he saw the plane go down.

He grabbed his fire gear from his car and ''ran over to do what I could,'' he told the NBC's ''Today'' show Wednesday.

Within minutes, Cooper was carrying a seriously burned 10-year-old boy from the house. He set the child in the yard, then went back in for the father. He said he also tried to get to neighbors in the burning house next door but couldn't find anyone before a Sanford police officer pulled him out for his own safety.

Five people in all died in the crash -- two adults aboard the plane and a woman and two children in the destroyed homes.

Among the victims were 54-year-old Dr. Bruce Kennedy, a Daytona Beach plastic surgeon and husband of International Speedway Corp. President Lesa France Kennedy, and NASCAR Aviation pilot Michael Klemm, 56. The victims on the ground were identified as 24-year-old law student Janise Joseph-Woodard, her 6-month-old son, and their next-door neighbor, 4-year-old Gabriela Dechat.

The little girl's parents, Milagros Dechat, 33, and Peter Dechat, 36, were seriously injured.

Eric Domnitz, who lives down the street, had rushed over with a fire extinguisher to try to help and described a horrific scene.

''It's in my head. The woman was just melting. It looked like her skin was just melting off,'' he said. ''The guy, he was melting. He looked like wax.''

The 10-year-old boy, whose name has not been released, was taken to Cincinnati Burn Center with burns over 80 to 90 percent of his body. Another neighbor, Dennis Misuraca, said the child ''looked like he had a flannel shirt on, but he didn't have a shirt on -- he was just really that burned.''

Cooper said he tried to search for Dechat's younger child but couldn't get up the stairs.

''I walked in as far as I could. The jet fuel that was dumping down from the second story to the first floor stopped me,'' he said.

Screaming neighbors told him people remained in the second house on fire, but Cooper said he couldn't find anyone after he kicked in the door.

The small plane was traveling from Daytona Beach to Lakeland on Tuesday when the pilot declared there was smoke in the cockpit. It was not clear who was flying the plane; NASCAR said it was Kennedy, but investigators said earlier it was Klemm.

The pilot was directed to land at the Sanford Airport but air traffic control lost radar contact around 8:40 a.m. The plane crashed a few miles away.

The National Transportation Safety Board will focus its investigation of the crash on ''man, machine and the environment,'' NTSB vice chairman Robert Sumwalt said.

''We'll be reviewing the aircraft maintenance records and any other records associated with this airplane,'' he said. The investigation will also focus on any services the plane may have received before or during the flight, including fueling and maintenance.

At the crash site, rescue crews arrived to a ''heavy, dark column of smoke'' worsened by the airplane fuel. ''The plane's in numerous pieces throughout the five or six homes' backyard,'' said Matt Minnetto, an investigator with the Sanford Fire Department.

The plane was registered to Competitor Liaison Bureau Inc. of Daytona Beach. Online records from the Department of State Division of Corporations show the company is registered under the name of William C. France, the NASCAR chairman who died last month at age 74 at his Daytona Beach home. Lesa France Kennedy, whose husband died in the plane crash, is France's daughter.

''Our deepest sympathies and prayers are with all of those who were involved in this tragic accident and their families,'' NASCAR said in a statement.

Gov. Charlie Crist said Bruce Kennedy was a great friend. ''When I went to the Homestead race, he was kind enough to take me around to meet the drivers. He was gracious beyond words,'' Crist told The Daytona Beach News-Journal.

At Florida A&M College, professors consoled Joseph-Woodard's classmates Tuesday night.

''Janise balanced law school, a family and a healthy marriage. And she did it well,'' classmate Nikeisha Ford said.

July 11, 2007

NATA: FAA Eyes Bizjet "Scheduled Service"



By

Glenn Pew

, Contributing Editor

Operators that post alerts through brokers or any other method regarding empty-leg flights may find their operations deemed as "scheduled" by the FAA, according to NATA's interpretation of words spoken by Joe Conte, manager of the operations law branch within the FAA Chief Counsel’s office. Conte spoke at NATA's Air Charter Summit and warned that posting such notices might lead the FAA to redefine an operation as a scheduled flight that must be conducted under Part 121, as opposed to Part 135. According to NATA, there are two key elements affecting the FAA's determination. First, setting a timeframe within which the aircraft must leave satisfies the "departure time" element. And second, the shorter that timeframe, the more it will look to the FAA like it is a scheduled operation.

Senate subcommittee approves 3.5% raise for 2008

By AMY DOOLITTLE

July 10, 2007

A Senate Appropriations subcommittee on Tuesday approved an across-the-board 3.5 percent pay raise for federal employees in 2008, mirroring a pay raise approved late last month by the House.

The raise is part of a $21.8 billion Senate financial services and general government spending bill that the full Senate Appropriations Committee will consider Thursday. It provides $12.3 billion for the Treasury Department, including $11.1 billion for the IRS. It is $400 million above the version approved by the House.

“This bill addresses a wide range of issues from increased funding for court security programs and meth prevention initiatives, to expanding the budget of the Consumer Product Safety Commission so they can better safeguard the public,” subcommittee Chairman Richard Durbin, D-Ill., said. “We’ve made tough decisions, with tight funds, in the face of many worthy demands.”

The bill is a $3.4 billion increase over 2007 and $414 million above the president’s request. It bill zeroes out funding for the vice president’s office, a contentious measure that will likely be overturned on the floor. A similar measure — in reaction to the vice president’s refusal to comply with executive branch documents requirements by arguing his office is not part of the executive branch — was rejected by the House late last month. RONALD BROWNSTEIN

Don't leave this law behind

Progress is slow under Bush's 2001 education reform, but No Child Left Behind is worth improving.

Ronald Brownstein
July 11, 2007
THE COMPLAINTS are reaching a crescendo as Congress moves closer to reauthorizing No Child Left Behind, the education reform law that President Bush passed with rare bipartisan support in 2001. Conservatives are wailing about federal intrusion. Teachers unions and some leading Democrats moan that the law relies too much on testing as the measure of student progress. And some parents echo each of those indictments.
There's no doubt the law has minted enemies. But Kati Haycock, president of the Education Trust, a nonpartisan group that advocates for low-income children, has it right when she says the law wasn't designed "to make people happy." It was passed because too many students in too many places were not learning enough. It wouldn't be doing its job if it left in place the practices that produced those unacceptable results. Grumbling, in education as in everything else, is the inevitable price of change.
And the evidence is that change is generating some progress. The Center for Education Policy, an independent research organization, recently found that the share of students demonstrating proficiency in reading and (especially) math is up in most states since the law's passage. In most places, achievement gaps between white and minority students are narrowing. The problem, on both fronts, is that improvement is coming too slowly. The overall gains remain relatively modest. And the gaps between white and minority students, though narrowed, remain dauntingly wide in many places.
Those numbers — not the whining from teachers, the right or, yes, even parents — ought to be the beacon as Bush and Congress reconsider the law. Washington shouldn't try to silence the complainers but to sharpen the law's focus on helping the schools and students most in need. In some cases, such an emphasis may even mute the discontent.
Currently, the law requires every state to test every student annually in reading and math between third and eighth grade and once again in high school. Schools are required to annually increase the share of students who score at a proficient level on those tests — not only overall but in eight subgroups, such as African Americans or Latinos. If the school as a whole, or even a single group, fails to show "adequate yearly progress" for two consecutive years, the school is identified as needing improvement and confronted with an escalating series of interventions that can culminate in a state-ordered restructuring.
That system — the heart of the law — is mostly admirable. It ensures that schools focus on educating all their students. The problem is that it has produced a reverse Lake Wobegon syndrome, one in which all (or at least too many) schools are below average. Fully one in five schools that receive federal Title I education dollars are now identified as needing improvement. That trend is alienating parents and educators at basically solid schools tossed onto the "failing" pile because one or two groups underperformed. It also means states must spread their resources over so many "failing" schools that they can't concentrate on the most troubled. "They are swamped," says Bruce Reed, President Clinton's former chief domestic policy advisor. "They have too many failures to fix."
The Bush administration and leading Democrats should be able to agree on a solution: establish tiers to distinguish between schools that fall just short of their annual improvement targets and those with deep, systemic problems, and then direct most attention to the latter. "We should focus our resources on the chronic underperformers," says Education Secretary Margaret Spellings. Sen. Hillary Clinton (D-N.Y.) says much the same.
Keeping the focus on the neediest schools could guide other revisions. Haycock correctly argues that the formidable $3 billion a year the law provides for improving teacher quality should be targeted more precisely toward high-poverty schools, as the law intended, rather than spread over districtwide programs, as is now often done. Washington should also require states and districts to provide more sophisticated help to schools that persistently underperform and to ensure that students in those struggling schools can transfer to other public schools and receive after-school tutoring, as the law requires. Only a small fraction of eligible students receive those services today.
With immigration reform derailed, educational accountability offers Washington its last chance for a big bipartisan accomplishment this year. It won't be easy — conservative Republicans want to repeal the federal testing mandate, and teachers unions are pressing Democrats to dilute it by allowing schools to be judged not only by test scores but by fuzzier measures, such as teacher assessments. Such changes would amount to dismantling the foundation built since 2001. The better course is to dig deeper into the law's initial motivation and more effectively lift up the millions of children still left behind every day.
--

The bill also includes:

• $568 million for the Small Business Administration.

• $905 million for the Security and Exchange Commission.

• $118 million for the U.S. Postal Service.

Boeing Ex-Worker Is Charged

A WSJ NEWS ROUNDUP

July 11, 2007; Page A10



A former Boeing Co. worker accused of downloading sensitive internal documents and leaking them to the media was charged with 16 counts of computer trespass.

Gerald Lee Eastman was arrested in May 2006, briefly held in jail and subsequently fired from his job as a quality-assurance inspector in Boeing's Seattle-area propulsion division, the company confirmed.

In a statement of probable cause, a Seattle police detective said Mr. Eastman downloaded hundreds of thousands of pages of documents that contained information he didn't have authorization to access and shared some of it with reporters at The Seattle Times and the Seattle Post-Intelligencer.

Mr. Eastman, charged in a state court in Seattle, is scheduled to be arraigned Monday. He faces a standard range of about three and a half years to nearly five years in prison if convicted on all counts. He couldn't be reached for comment.

Police said Mr. Eastman told investigators he "was disgruntled with Boeing" because he had brought several issues related to inspection of parts to the company and to the Federal Aviation Administration. "He contended that none of his concerns were addressed to his satisfaction by either the company or the FAA, and that he continued to try to get his concerns heard and rectified to his satisfaction," court documents said.

Boeing spokesman Tim Neale said, "We always take those types of allegations seriously and have processes in place to follow them up."

He added, "We have tightened our security system so that in today's environment someone could not obtain sensitive documents in the same manner he did."

 

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FAA Centralizes Air Trafffic Duties To Save A Buck

 

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(CBS) PALM SPRINGS, Calif. Radar control for Palm Springs International Airport will be handled beginning Wednesday by San Diego-based Southern California Terminal Approach Control, the busiest facility of its kind in the world, an official said.
The Federal Aviation Administration was hammering out details with representatives for Sen. Barbara Boxer, D-Calif.
"She has asked us to provide her office with an operational assessment after 30 days, which we will do," Brown said.
Boxer recently made a deal with the FAA and the National Air Traffic Controllers Association to operate the Palm Springs radar out of SoCal TRACON on a trial basis while keeping the Palm Springs radar facility viable for the next six months. Boxer sent a letter to FAA adminstrator Marion C. Blakey Tuesday requesting a 30-day trial.
"... If there remain serious disagreements after the trial period concludes, I intend to continue pursuing legislative solutions in the Senate," Boxer wrote Blakey.
The consolidation with SoCal TRACON will not affect passenger safety, said Air Traffic Controllers Association local president Jim Corey.
"We're salvaging the best of a bad situation and we will have four controllers in San Diego tomorrow training their controllers," Corey said, adding that airspace around Palm Springs International Airport was unique because of rough terrain and wind patterns.
FAA officials say the consolidation of the Palm Springs radar control with SoCal TRACON is necessary in order to save money.
Pilots, air traffic controllers and legislators, including Rep. Mary Bono, R-Palm Springs, Boxer and Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., all have expressed opposition to consolidate the airport's radar with SoCal TRACON due to safety concerns and staffing shortages.
SoCal TRACON handles more than 2.1 million aircraft a year.
"It's kind of like cough syrup that you have to take but it doesn't taste good," Hamid Ghaffari, the NATCA's western regional vice president said. "I'm not ecstatic about it, but we will make the consolidation as safe as possible under the constraints."
The NATCA, which was unhappy about inadequate training and staffing levels at SoCal TRACON, worked out a compromise with the FAA to send Palm Springs controllers to San Diego to train their controllers on the Coachella Valley's geographical terrain. The FAA had intended to use simulator training only, according to Corey.
Palm Springs air traffic controllers began training controllers in San Diego last month and will continue until mid- to late-October.
"We want this transition to be safe and smooth," Corey said, adding that his association was still concerned that the downgrade of the Palm Springs radar facility could mean lower pay for Palm Springs controllers.
"The FAA is vacillating on that," Corey said. "If that happens, that means they'll go elsewhere and we'll get more entry level controllers here" in Palm Springs.

The Oklahoman

AMERICA'S air transportation system carried more than 750 million passengers in 2006, but that's just 75 percent of what the system is expected to carry by 2015.






Top of Form


Bottom of Form


With a billion passengers a year in the offing, how will a system based on old technologies handle the load? According to the Federal Aviation Administration, the status quo will no longer fly.

The FAA solution is the Next Generation Air Transportation System, or "NextGen,” based on satellite navigation and control and digital, nonverbal communication. It would replace a system in which traffic control involves handing off aircraft from one radar site to another as planes move through space.

FAA officials say the current system, despite a remarkable safety record, is rapidly reaching its limit. In the first half of June, the number of canceled flights was up by more than 90 percent over the same period of 2006. FlightsStats.com says only 71 percent of flights arrived on time from June 1-15, down from 79 percent in 2006. "Excessive” delays (45 minutes or more) rose by 61 percent.

These statistics aren\'t solely attributable to an antiquated control system. Weather, labor issues and the busy summer flying season must share the blame. And even the most high-tech system available can\'t prevent thunderstorms.

NextGen\'s supporters, though, say a revamped system will reduce delays and cut fuel consumption and emissions. The price is steep: $4.6 billion just for the initial phase, which doesn\'t include equipping aircraft with compatible gear. Promised benefits include cutting by half the delays that occur in optimal weather conditions and at least some delay reductions when the weather\'s rough.

The nation has little choice but to upgrade its sky traffic management system. Still up in the air is how it will be funded. Oklahoma City is a major employment center for the FAA, so NextGen\'s development will be more than a blip on the radar screen here.

New Mexico Governor Bill Richardson Criticizes Flawed FAA Investigation of US Airways

Tue, 07/10/2007 - 08:54 — admin

July 8, 2007 -- SANTA FE – New Mexico Governor Bill Richardson issued the following statement in response to the Federal Aviation Administration’s investigative report concluding that US Airways was cleared of wrongdoing in the Dana Papst case.

Unlike the FAA, the New Mexico Department of Public Safety conducted a thorough investigation and concluded -- with the help of witness statements -- that Dana Papst was served alcohol while already drunk aboard U.S. Airways. Papst, whose blood-alcohol was four times the legal limit, drove head-on into another vehicle last November, killing five members of a Las Vegas family.

“I am not surprised that the FAA came to a different conclusion after failing to interview any passengers,” Governor Richardson said. “This tragic incident is an example of why states must be more involved in regulating the serving of alcohol on airlines that fly into our state and have a direct impact on the public safety of New Mexico citizens.”

The state recently denied a temporary extension of U.S. Airway’s license to sell alcohol aboard its airlines that fly into New Mexico. The state Regulation and Licensing Department is reviewing U.S. Airways’ application for a permanent license.

Source: New Mexico Governor

So far....So good. World airline safety

By David Learmount


Worldwide airline safety has been better, statistically, in the first six months of 2007 than it has ever been for the same period. Although the number of deaths has been lower several times before, the number of fatal accidents globally has reached a record low.

There have been only 11 fatal accidents to 30 June this year, taking into account all categories of commercial airline operations, including cargo (see graph). The lowest previous total was 12, achieved in the first six months of 2003 and 1984. In 1984, however, the amount of traffic was about one-third of what it is now. The number of fatalities to 30 June this year was 312, which is below the average for the past 10 years, but in some years it has fallen much lower than that because casualties per accident were fewer. In fact most of the fatalities this year occurred in just two accidents: the Adam Air Boeing 737-400 in Indonesia (102 deaths) and the Kenya Airways 737-800 in Cameroon (114 deaths) (see accidents listing, starting P38). All the crashes except one (Kenya Airways) involved veteran aircraft, and they occurred in parts of the world where accident rates are consistently above the global average and serious accidents are still relatively common.

By contrast, there has been no fatal jet accident involving a major Western European, North American or Australasian carrier since the November 2001 crash of an American Airlines Airbus A300-600 at Belle Harbor, New York, and that applies also to the great majority of major intercontinental carriers from other regions.

Age factor



This year's Kenya Airways crash happened to involve a new 737-800, and it was only the second fatal accident affecting a Next Generation 737 in the 10 years since the series went into service. Because most recent crashes in African countries and elsewhere have involved veteran jets and turboprops, some nations have been considering removing certificates of airworthiness from old aircraft, including 737-200s and aircraft of similar vintage, in the belief that aircraft age is a major factor in crash causes. In 2002, Russia decided to revoke permanently the operating certificates for the 17 remaining Ilyushin Il-18 four-engined turboprop airliners following an accident, even though none of them was as old as the 1947-built Grumman Turbo Mallard that crashed fatally in the USA in December 2005 operating a scheduled passenger service. Nigeria, for example, is considering grounding all commercial transport aircraft beyond a certain age on the premise that it cannot guarantee their structural and electrical safety when maintenance becomes a much more extensive - and expensive - job. The results of the inquiry into the Kenya Airways accident will inevitably confirm that taking such measures is not enough on its own.

Special regulation



Taken to extremes, however, the operation of very old aircraft in public transport roles needs a special form of regulation, according to US National Transportation Safety Board chairman Mark Rosenker. At a public hearing last month on the Chalks Ocean Airways Mallard crash, Rosenker said: "This accident tragically illustrates a gap in the safety net with regard to older airplanes. The signs of structural problems were there - but not addressed."

The technical accident report gave the probable cause as "the failure and separation of the right wing, which resulted from the airline's failure to identify and properly repair fatigue cracks in the wing, and the failure of the FAA to detect and correct deficiencies in the company's maintenance programme".

Considering this and other structural failure accidents to very old airframes, last year the NTSB had recommended that the FAA eliminate an exemption that allows aircraft with fewer than 30 seats type-certificated before 1 January 1958 to forgo certain supplemental inspections that would reveal fatigue faults. That exemption applies to about 80 transport aircraft on the US register.

Indonesia, which has never had a good safety record, has suffered two jet fatal accidents so far this year, but that was not all. One of the carriers involved - Adam Air - having lost a 737 with all on board on 1 January, saw one of its crews land another 737 so hard that the fuselage bent in the middle.

Meanwhile, the accident investigator studying the Garuda Indonesian Airlines 737 accident on 7 March in which 21 people died, has issued preliminary statements indicating that the aircraft approached the airport too fast, too steeply, and incorrectly configured for landing. Garuda has suffered four fatal accidents in the past 21 years. Indonesian domestic carrier Merpati Nusantara has had 14 fatal accidents in the past two decades.

Last week Indonesia signed an unprecedented declaration with the International Civil Aviation Organisation, committing the country to "prompt and wide-ranging action for improving the safety of its civil aviation system". Speaking at the Indonesian Strategic Aviation Safety Summit in Bali, ICAO president Roberto Kobeh Gonzales said: "There is an urgent need to implement a concrete, realistic and achievable plan of action." (see box below).

Meanwhile, some soul-searching is going on in the USA about a consistent and demonstrable safety vulnerability in one particular sector. In the first six months of this year, the USA has seen four runway incursion events (see accident listings) that came close to being disastrous, and this reflects previous recorded experience. This has given the NTSB's Rosenker another reason to attack the FAA, which has been independently taken to task in a report by the Department of Transportation watchdog agency the Inspector General's Office. The IGO says the number of runway incursions in the USA has not fallen during the past five years despite action by the FAA.

Dangerous events continue to occur at four major international airports: in FY2005 and 2006, says the IGO, Boston Logan airport suffered 22 runway incursion incidents (one severe), Chicago O'Hare 15 incidents (five severe), Los Angeles International 16 (two severe) and Philadelphia 16 (one severe). According to the IGO, the specific local remedial actions that have now been carried out by these airports were not adopted until after a serious runway incursion had occurred.

Rosenker says one causal factor in these events is the failure of the airport movement area safety system to perform as intended. So Africa and Indonesia may have their problems, but no country, however advanced, is immune from safety challenges.

 



By Brad Heath, USA TODAY
 

Advertisement





Casualties on ground rare in small-plane crashes


Hundreds of small airplanes get into serious accidents every year, often killing their pilots and passengers — and almost never hurting anyone on the ground.

Before a crash this week in Florida killed three people in two homes outside Orlando, just 35 people had been killed over the past two decades when small planes smashed into houses, cars and even a canoe, a USA TODAY analysis of National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) records shows.

MORE: Planes hits homes in Fla.; 5 killed

Eleven more died in accidents that happened before the plane even left the ground, usually by walking into a spinning propeller.

"It's one of those things everyone's afraid of, but when you talk about probabilities, it's like talking about things like lightning strikes or shark attacks," says Chris Dancy, a spokesman for the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association.

2010-07-19 18:44
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